keeping your heart healthy with healthy diet

Eating a heart-healthy diet pays big benefits, like better cholesterol and blood sugar levels, blood pressure, and weight.

Surprise: Eating this way can taste good! While most diets tell you what you can’t eat, it’s more powerful to focus on what you can eat.

Take these nuggets of nutrition wisdom to heart:

healthy living tips : www.allhealthguide.com

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1.    Eat more fish.Fish is a good source of protein and other nutrients. Some fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, also gives you omega-3 fatty acids, which may cut your risk of heart disease and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends two servings a week of fish that are rich in omega-3s.
2.    Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans. Plant foods are a powerful help in fighting heart disease. You get nutrients, fiber, and almost endless variety that you can cook in many different ways.
3.    Avoid artificial trans fats completely. They raise your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol level.Items that may have trans fat include baked goods, snack foods (such as microwave popcorn), frozen pizza, fast food, vegetable shortenings, stick margarines, coffee creamer, refrigerated dough products (such as biscuits and cinnamon rolls), and ready-to-use frostings. Even if the label says “0 grams trans fat,” they may still have a tiny bit of trans fat; so check the ingredients list on packaged foods for “partially hydrogenated oils.” Those are trans fats.
4.    Limit saturated fat to no more than 7% to 10% of calories. Check food labels to see how much saturated fat is in a serving of butter, hard margarine, salad dressing, fried foods, snack foods, sweets, and desserts.
5.    When you use added fat, use fats high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats (for example, fats found in canola, olive, and peanut oil). You still need to limit how much you use, even with “good” fats, because they are high in calories.
6.    Eat a variety of protein foods. Favor fish, lean cuts of meat, poultry (without the skin), low-fat or fat-free dairy, beans, nuts, tofu, and legumes.
7.    Limit cholesterol. Don’t get more than 300 milligrams per day of cholesterol from your diet.
8.    Cut back on salt. This will help control your blood pressure. Most people get too much sodium, and a lot of it comes from packaged foods.
9.    Enjoy every bite. When you enjoy what you eat, it’s easier to keep eating that way.

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Source : webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-healthy-diet

Although you might know that eating certain foods can increase your heart disease risk, it’s often tough to change your eating habits. Whether you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt or you simply want to fine-tune your diet, here are eight heart-healthy diet tips. Once you know which foods to eat more of and which foods to limit, you’ll be on your way toward a heart-healthy diet.

1. Control your portion size

How much you eat is just as important as what you eat. Overloading your plate, taking seconds and eating until you feel stuffed can lead to eating more calories, fat and cholesterol than you should. Portions served in restaurants are often more than anyone needs. Keep track of the number of servings you eat — and use proper serving sizes — to help control your portions. Eating more of low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and less of high-calorie, high-sodium foods, such as refined, processed or fast foods, can shape up your diet as well as your heart and waistline.

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A serving size is a specific amount of food, defined by common measurements such as cups, ounces or pieces. For example, one serving of pasta is 1/2 cup, or about the size of a hockey puck. A serving of meat, fish or chicken is 2 to 3 ounces, or about the size and thickness of a deck of cards. Judging serving size is a learned skill. You may need to use measuring cups and spoons or a scale until you’re comfortable with your judgment.
2. Eat more vegetables and fruits

Vegetables and fruits are good sources of vitamins and minerals. Vegetables and fruits are also low in calories and rich in dietary fiber. Vegetables and fruits contain substances found in plants that may help prevent cardiovascular disease. Eating more fruits and vegetables may help you eat less high-fat foods, such as meat, cheese and snack foods.

Featuring vegetables and fruits in your diet can be easy. Keep vegetables washed and cut in your refrigerator for quick snacks. Keep fruit in a bowl in your kitchen so that you’ll remember to eat it. Choose recipes that have vegetables or fruits as the main ingredient, such as vegetable stir-fry or fresh fruit mixed into salads.

Source : mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/in-depth/heart-healthy-diet/art-20047702

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